Sports Used to Describe Bipolar Disorder

sports

Downhill Skiing- You get all the way to the top easily (mania) and then come down (depression) quickly.

Wrestling- It is a constant struggle

Ping pong- rapid unpredictable bouncing

Football- Sometimes with all of your friends and family, you make a touchdown. However, sometimes you fall short.

Basketball-  Dribbling represents small ups and downs that are somewhat normal. However, when the ball is thrown towards the basket it goes straight up (mania) and comes crashing down (mania)

Gymnastics- Scoring a perfect ten is difficult, but can be done. However, most of the time you are working hard to get it.

NASCAR racing- It’s  fast and furious with a lot of crashes along the way and casualties sometimes include by-standers.

Hockey- It can get rough and scoring does not happen very often, but it can be done

Marathon Running- With hard work and persaverence, you can do just about anything

Swimming- You have to dive in to get started

Baseball- With help from your loved ones, you can make it all the way around the bases

Tennis- Back and forth, back and forth (mania and depression)

Pole vaulting- The higher you go, the harder you fall

Archery- It is hard to get it right every time, but when you do hit the bull’s eye, it is a wonderful feeling

Boxing- Even if you are ready for a fight, sometimes you get knocked out anyway

Volleyball- Dig, Set, Spike= Mildly depressed, jolted into mania, crashing into depression

Bowling- Sometimes you do your best and strike out

Canoeing/Kayaking- Even if you capsize, you can get back in the boat and glide a long again

Horseback Riding- If you don’t do everything you can to control the horse (illness), it will take off can go its own way.  However, sometimes even if you try and control the horse, (it gets spooked), you can’t control it

Fishing- You never know for sure what you’re going to get

Cheer leading- You can cheer for others, but you must take care of yourself first

Hiking- It’s simply hard work to up and down the hills

Rock Climbing- It is really hard to get to the top , but with determination you can achieve great things. You might fall a long the way and things might be difficult, but you have to keep trying

Weight Lifting- It might feel like all the weight is on your shoulders, but with the proper training (treatment)  you can lift the weight off

Tug of War- You feel like you are being pulled between mania and depression, but you can win

Camping- You can have a lot of fun (mania), but there is usually a mess to clean up afterwards

Soccer- Even though it takes effort by you and all your team mates (loved ones)  it is possible to get past the goalie and score.

Golf- You don’t always get a hole-in-one, but you shouldn’t let that keep you from still trying

 

Note: A few of these ideas I got from a group I run called Advocates for People with Mental Illnesses

Picture found at: FreeImages

 

 

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About Michelle Clark Bipolar Bandit

I am a strong advocate for the mentally ill and have been since I was first approached by a lawyer in a psychiatric facility as a teenager. He wanted me to help him fight how the mentally ill are mistreated. I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder at the age of 17 after a full blown manic episode. Before that, I suffered from debilitating depression for 4 years. My goals are to help others by sharing my story and providing tips to deal with mania and depression. I often write blogs related to advocating for people like myself. I want to encourage, inspire, and educate those with #bipolar disorder and other mental illnesses and also include inspirational #quotes. I founded the group Advocates for People with Mental Illnesses and the page Mental Health Advocates United and have several social media sites that are related to bipolar disorder and/or advocacy. If you are an advocate or would like to be, I hope you join our FB group: Advocates for People with Mental Illnesses
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2 Responses to Sports Used to Describe Bipolar Disorder

  1. susanLBcanada says:

    Put me down for Swimming… tomorrow I’m diving in. I must jump start my life and since I love swimming, I know I am going to succeed! (As apposed to the more common, “Mayday, Mayday, I’m going in!”) Thanks for your perfect timing in posting this.

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